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Decisions decisions

There are good decisions, there are bad decisions and then there is the worst decision of all: No decision. Earlier this summer I attended a lecture with Dr Khaled Soufani at the Judge Business School and during that lecture he made a comparison between British and US Tech companies and the fact that the latter were far more innovative and likely to succeed than the former. He put this down to one key difference which after living and working in the UK for the last 5 years I wholeheartedly agree…

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Take a Leap of Faith

“Few things help an individual more than to place responsibility upon him, and to let him know that you trust him.” – Booker T. Washington Trust is very difficult for most organisations. By their very nature and structures they are set up with hierarchies designed to limit exposure to the potential damage a breach of trust could have on the organisation. This is very understandable. Ultimately all organisations are made up of people and as Abraham Maslow pointed out in his hierarchy of needs; security and protection are only just above…

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Principles of an emergent enterprise

In returning to my favoured topic of the moment (and a lengthy dissertation it’s proving to be) I’d like to give some ideas as to what I believe are the core principles of an emergent enterprise. Transparency. Ok, let’s start with some controversy. What’s wrong with total transparency? Why don’t organisations embrace it? The issue is that most organisations don’t “trust” their workforce, particularly the “lower level” people. Why do we hire people we don’t trust? If we do trust our people then…

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Don't hire "outside the box" thinkers and place them in a box

Euan Semple (@euan) mentioned something on Twitter a few weeks ago which I immediately saved as it resonated with this topic: “onboarding” sounds perilously close to “waterboarding” This is such a good way of putting it I hardly need to expand on it but I will since it converges very nicely with what this article is about. As organisations we strive to buy the cleverest (often very expensive) tools to achieve what we need and hire the cleverest (also expensive) people we can afford to use/run them. Rarely do…

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Noone ever fixed a process by adding more process

One of the recurring problems I’ve come across in organisation after organisation is this tendency for “Process” to become a lodestone for everything to accrete to over time. Eventually you end up with a situation where the “Process”, originally intended to get the organisation towards some goal has become a ravenous beast in and of itself which requires more effort to sustain it than is required to deliver the goal it was created to achieve in the first place and every time we come across a problem with the…

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